The transparency panel at IPSA 2016 Posnan, Poland
IPSA Poznan 2016: Transparency panel
Business meeting, Posnan 2016
Business meeting at Posnan, 2016
Leonid Smorgunov announces his book publication, Posnan 2016
Posnan 2016: book publication announcement

IPSA RC 48: Research Committee on Administrative Culture

RC 48 home page | Members contact list | Panel Descriptions 2018 | Abstracts 2018 | Minutes 2018

Panels proposed by RC48 for participants at the IPSA World Congress, 2018

Developing Public Policy in Collaboration between the State and Civil Society Groups

Transparency, Open Government, E-governance, Surveillance, Sous-veillance, and the Changing Culture of Administration

Limiting Corruption and Upholding Ethics and Natural Justice in Administrative Culture in Developing Societies

Administrative Culture amid Issues of the New Nationalism, Borders, Margins, Post-Colonialism or Inequality

Governance and Administrative Culture in South Asian Countries

Governance of Public Policy, Culture, and Sustainable Development

(This unofficial arrangement is of course, subject to change. The official information is found at wc2018.IPSA.org. The business meeting for RC48 will be scheduled by IPSA and will be announced here.)



Developing Public Policy in Collaboration between the State and Civil Society Groups

There is renewed interest among scholars of public administration in exploring the possibilities of civic participation in policy-making and implementation. This varies from the White House wikis that encouraged participation online about policy proposals in the US, to the Russian attempts to provide some budget for civil society groups to conduct public administration. In western, pluralist democracies there are tens of thousands of civil society groups attempting to persuade administrators of policy -- but how are these developing in other countries, and with what effects? How much room is there in authoritarian regimes for state-civil society administration? Papers are welcome on any of these topics, with preference given to those having impact beyond one country.
Convenor: Dr. Jeremy Lewis
Chair: Dr. Leonid Smorgunov

Discussant: Dr. Jeremy Lewis




Transparency, Open Government, E-governance, Surveillance, Sous-veillance, and the Changing Culture of Administration
From small beginnings in the 1970s with a movement for freedom of information and privacy laws, the transparency movement now encompasses the majority of nation states. Inquiry ranges from journalists' rights to information to officials' rights to privacy; from official email on private servers to online delivery of administrative services; and from surveillance by intelligence services to sous-veillance of police by citizens with cell phones. In this rapidly changing environment, what is the effect on administrative culture and practice? Papers are welcome on any of these topics, with preference given to those having impact beyond one country.
Convenor: Dr. Jeremy Lewis
Chair: Dr. Jeremy Lewis

Discussant: Dr. Leonid Smorgunov



Limiting Corruption and Upholding Ethics and Natural Justice in Administrative Culture in Developing Societies

There has been widespread interest in measures to reduce corruption across many countries, ranging from penalizing large corporations when they are caught paying bribes to politicians for contracts, to establishing rankings of the most corrupt countries. Some of the evidence has emerged from large leaks of data via the Panama Papers or WikiLeaks. This puts renewed stress on interactions between courts and watchdog groups on the one hand and administration on the other. How have these tensions been resolved in different countries? What methods and countervailing institutions (such as independent judiciary or commissions) are effective? What issues of ethics are there beyond the major issue of corruption? Papers are welcome on any of these topics, with preference given to those having impact beyond one country.
Convenor: Dr. Jeremy Lewis
Chair: Dr. Ashok Basu
Co-Chair: Dr. Nittam Chandel
Discussant: Dr. Erica Gorbak.





Administrative Culture amid Issues of the New Nationalism, Borders, Margins, Post-Colonialism or Inequality
The rise of nationalist politicians across many democracies in recent years has revived the fears of De Tocqueville (1835) of the tyranny of the majority. In addition, flows of migrants across porous borders have raised issues of national identity and severely challenged free trade pacts. Refugees and ethno-religious minorities existing at the margins of society have also suffered waves of discrimination or expulsion. Post-colonial effects and widespread inequality also challenge bureaucracies in many societies. From all of these turbulent processes, how will administrative culture be changed? Papers are welcome on any of these topics, with preference given to those having impact beyond one country.
Convenor: Dr. Jeremy Lewis
Chair: Dr. Jayanta Sarmah
Co-Chair: TBA
Discussant: Dr. Mamta Mokta





Governance and Administrative Culture in South Asian Countries
The South Asian region includes Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. All of these countries except Nepal and Bhutan share a common history of colonial dominance. They also present major variations in terms of geography, territorial and population size, religion, culture, and language. Even with regard to governance, these countries show significant differences. India, since its independence has adopted parliamentary since 1947 but still facing governance issues at different levels of the governments. In Pakistan the governance is weaken by jihadists and Islamic religious terror. In fact religious fundamentalists groups are posing great threat not only for the Pakistan but also to all its neighbours like India, Afghanistan and other countries of the region. Other countries like Nepal, Bhutan and Maldives have though lately opted for multi party democracy are also facing various socio-political challenges as the institutions and processes are not matured enough to carry out policies of the government. Sri Lanka though has demonstrated a stable political development after the defeat of LTTE, but is the first Asian country seriously crippled under a severe debt problem.
In nutshell, poverty, ignorance, corruption, nepotism, terrorism, drug trafficking crimes, violation of human rights and various other politico and socio-cultures factors are posing a serious challenge to governance in these South Asian countries. Only effective governance can solve these issues. Better governance and administrative culture is also vital for the execution of ‘Agenda 2030’ which are relevant to South Asian countries as thirty seven percent of the world’s poor population and nearly half of the world’s malnourished children lives here.
Therefore, the present panel will focus on the governance and administrative culture of South Asian Countries which will be analyzed along two dimensions. The first dimension will focus on certain espoused principles of public administration, namely, accountability, transparency, and participation which is essential for the effectiveness of a governance system, the second dimension will focus on the institutional authority system essential for bringing sustainable and resilient development in these countries.
Convenor: Dr. Nittam Chandel
Chair: Prof. Mamta Mokta
Co-chair: Dr. Ashok Ranjan Basu
Discussant: Dr. Vandana Sharma




Governance of Public Policy, Culture, and Sustainable Development
The panel is organized for the purpose of exchanging the ideas on the cultural and institutional perspectives for sustainable development through governance of public policy. The research actuality is related to search of foundations for handling new designs of public policy for developed and developing economies. Practical actuality is determined by the need to push forward the academic constructed model of public policy regimes for evaluation of public policy processes. The purpose of the panel is defined by the opportunity to discuss innovative institutional and cultural components of governance of public policy directed to sustainability. It is important to discuss how inclusive institutions work in public policy for cultural, social, gender, and age justice. We invite papers with comparison and assessment of public policy process for more governability and competitiveness of modern states in network and multi-cultural contexts.
Convenor: Prof. Leonid Smorgunov
Chair: Dr. Erica Gorbak
Discussant: Dr. Radomir Bolgov


Page revised on 10 December 2017 by Jeremy Lewis