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PSC 207: Public Administration | PSC 306: Public Organizations

Richard J. Stillman (ed), Public Administration: Concepts & Cases, 9/e (2010)

Students' Outlines: Conceptual Readings | 7e cases | 8e cases | new 9e cases only

Thanks to contributors; compiled by Dr. Jeremy Lewis |  Revised 10 Mar. 2011



Stillman Chap. 3: Environment, Ecology of Public Admin.

Case 3, Terry L. Cooper and Thomas A. Bryer, "William Robertson: Exemplar of Politics and Public Management Rightly Understood", 9e
Lecture notes by Jeremy Lewis, Spring 2011

The exemplar is a city administrator of roads, who rose through the ranks in the marine corps and then in the city workforce, without higher education.  In 18 years he reached to top of the department.

He works long days, spending many evenings holding forums with neighborhood councils, for whom he obtains office space.

Sherry Arnstein the Ladder of Citizen Participation (1969)

  1. zero-sum power struggle between government and citizens
  2. citizen control at top
  3. steps in middle ...
  4. manipulation at bottom of ladder
Cooper's Circle of participation (he does not view it as linear, taking a more positive view of genuine sharing)
  1. Manipulation
  2. Therapy
  3. Informing
  4. Consultation
  5. Placation
  6. Partnership
  7. Delegated power
  8. Citizen control
Lessons Learned: Exemplars
  1. Pursue both interests of agency and clients, by cultivating relationships with all stakeholders
  2. Use multiple political tools: manipulation, placation & partnership
  3. Exercise political skills transparently and without bias
  4. Practice honest y and integrity, while expecting the same from others
A postscript notes that, while this article's draft was criticized by a reviewer for lacking criticism of Robertson, it was difficult to do so in an article about an exemplar!


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Stillman Chap. 8: Decisionmaking & Incremental Choice.
Case 8: Michael Grunwald and Susan B. Lasser, "How a City Slowly Drowned", 9e [new: notes needed]
 



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Stillman Chap. 10: Executive Management & Effectiveness.
Case 10: Abhijit Jain, Munir Mandiviwalla, and Rajiv D. Banker, "Government as Catalyst, Can it Work Again with Wireless Internet Access?", 9e [new: notes needed]
by Chimee Zorigbataar, Spring 2011
City of Philadelphia: 40% of the population is nonusers of the internet access
Need of an MWN (Municipal Wireless Network)-wireless internet access network that is created with active local gov’t leadership and involvement
Drivers of the MWN:
• Technological availability-cheap, easy, and convenient
• Market opportunity-in poor urban and rural areas
• Historical precedent and policy imperative-for public goods and services gov’t is usually to intervene (water, health, electricity, education etc.)
• Reuse of available assets-traffic lamps and street lights considered highly appropriate for installing network components because its already spread out
• Legislative approval
• Socioeconomic potential-internet has positive impact on socioeconomic growth in local communities
Inhibitors of MWN:
• Technology risk-risky prospect, private sectors wouldn’t do it. MWN technology is not for large scale it’s for hotspots. So far small smesh networks deployed. Innovations every year, constantly changing and rapidly developing.
• Role of Gov’t-risk of gov’t owned quasi monopolies that will compete unfairly against commercial ISPs (Internet Service Provider). No taxes
• Potential gov’t incompetence-in the long run
• Legislative environment-proponents on both sides, uncertainty surrounding MWN
• Response from incumbent players-in future traditional communication system will converge on the internet (telephone, cellular phones and TV)
Philadelphia’s MWN:
• 5th largest city in U.S.
• 660,000 households
• 3.5 billion budget
• In 2000, new mayor Street, appointed new Chief information officer Dianah Neff
• Information Dept. budget of $80 million
Wireless Philadelphia, nonprofit org. to work on the creation of MWN
Stage 1. Goals and stakeholders requirements were identified and key policy issues were addressed
Stage 2. MWN application was identified the underlying infrastructure technology was selected and management and funding model to build and operate the network was specified
Stage 3. The network is built
Lessons learned:
One of the reasons was to promote social change and reduce disparity
1. Strong champion is required. 2004-2006 Dianah Neff and since 2006 Grey Goldman. Work extremely hard, keep up with the technology developments and change and maintain public interest
2. Diverse stakeholder’s interests must be managed. Such stakeholders as telecommunication companies, civic leaders, community groups, the media, state gov’t, city politicians, and public
3. Private and public interests need to be balanced. Earthlink led the technical and management aspects. Wireless Philadelphia led the social consciousness goals
4. The application must be identified. Internet access as the main application




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Stillman Chap. 12: Public Budgeting.
Case 12: Philip Taubman, "Death of a Spy Satellite Program", 9e [new: notes needed]


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Stillman Chap. 13: Implementation.
Case 13: Katherine Boo, "Expectations", 9e  [new: notes needed]



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Stillman Chap. 15: Public Interest & De-Regulation.
Case 15: James P. Pfiffner, "Torture and Public Policy", 9e [new: notes needed]



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Stillman Chap. 16: Competing Ethical Obligations.
Case 16: Richard D. White, Jr, "George Tenet and the Last Great Days of the CIA", 9e [new: notes needed]

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