St. Petersburg 2013: Public Values panel

St. Petersburg 2013: Rosamund Thomas appears

St. Petersburg 2013: Public Values panel

St. Petersburg 2013: Public Values panel


St. Petersburg 2013: Public Values panel

St. Petersburg 2013: Public Values panel

St. Petersburg 2013: Public Values panel

St. Petersburg 2013: Public Values panel
St. Petersburg 2013: Public Values seminar images from Leonid Smorgunov; album for the web by Jeremy Lewis

IPSA RC 48: Research Committee on Administrative Culture

RC-48 International Panel on Transparency at AlaPSA 2014

Page revised 16 April 2014, by Prof. Jeremy Lewis, Political-Science.org

 
IPSA 48 International panel on Transparency, at AlaPSA conference, 22 March 2014 in Montgomery, Alabama, USA 

Chair and discussant, Jeremy R.T. Lewis, Huntingdon College, USA and UK  (hosting chair of conference)
Heemsbergen, Luke J. (Australia & Canada). "Transparency and Democratic Governance: Radical Moments, Historical Shifts, and Current Experiments".

The paper argues that radical, networked, and participative transparency processes represent a key
tenet of the ongoing evolution of democratic political communication. However, a review of
transparency literature shows a currently myopic understanding of the political ramifications of
transparency in/of governance. Thus, the paper contextualizes the democratic importance of radical
transparency from historical comparative analysis of 18th Century Hansard and 20th Century Open
Diplomacy to show how ‘new’ media in specific contexts afford specific shifts to institutions of
governing. By doing so, the paper builds a framework with which to understand the current digital
processes of radical transparency, and balance against their effects.

To this end, two cases of radical digital transparency affecting political governance are used to
offer practical strategies of incorporating ‘radical transparency’ into new modes of politics that are
present in the network society. The first that case acts as an extreme benchmark is WikiLeaks. The
other is Oursay.org (Australia), which have both affected national elections in their host countries.
The paper concludes by extruding relevant policy prescriptions on planning, implementing and
measuring the limits of innovative networked transparency in democratic processes.

 

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